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Where do I start?


Navigating sexual violence reporting and support resources

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Following an experience of sexual assault or another form of sexual or relationship violence, it may be challenging to not only process the experience, but to decide whether or not you want to seek medical care, report the incident, or connect with mental health support. We also recognize that these situations can be even more complex when they occur within the context of a relationship. The questions below may be helpful to some victims and survivors in navigating resources, though how each individual processes their experience and prefers to seek out resources is different. For a full list of resources, visit https://sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/.

 

Exploring both “confidential” and “private” resources

Throughout this page, you will see the term “Confidential Resource” being used frequently. ASU’s three confidential resources for students — ASU Counseling Services, ASU Victim Services, and ASU Health Services — are not mandatory reporters. ASU Employees can also connect with the Employee Assistance Office for confidential support. All other university resources, including Student Advocacy and Assistance, The Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities and the Office of University Rights and Responsibilities are mandatory reporters. While these resources are not confidential, they are private and only share information with other university offices and officials who need to be involved in providing support or assisting with the reporting process.

 

Are you seeking resources for yourself or for someone you know?

If at any point you feel distressed, you can exit this webpage using the quick exit button in the right-hand corner of this page.

In addition to navigating through this page, visit the Sun Devil Support Network for more information on supporting someone who has experienced sexual or relationship violence.

At times, individuals may feel unsure about an incident, experience or relationship and be wary to use labels such as “violence" or “assault”. If you are experiencing distress and are concerned about an encounter, experience, or relationship, it can be helpful to talk to someone, even if you are still feeling unsure about what it was you experienced. Any experience which is causing discomfort, concern, or distress is worthy of seeking additional support.

Do you want to tell someone about your experience?

There isn’t a right or wrong answer when it comes to disclosure and it’s normal to feel unsure. For some individuals, the first step may be to tell a trusted family member or friend. The Rape Abuse and Incest National Network provides guidance on how to talk to a friend or family member.

Other victims/survivors might feel more comfortable talking with a trained advocate or mental health professional prior to talking with others. Visit the confidential support tab if you’d like to seek support from someone who does not have a mandatory reporting responsibility.

For some, they might be ready to report the incident. Visit sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/report for more information about how to report an incident of sexual violence.

It is okay if you decide you do not wish to tell someone about your experience. Even if you do not want to utilize resources around sexual violence, you can connect with support resources at ASU and/or in the community and not disclose your experience. Some victims and survivors tell someone about their experience right away, others disclose months or years later and some never tell anyone. The choice belongs to you, and you can always change your mind.

Continue to navigate the resources on this page and throughout the website to determine if you want to report the incident, get medical assistance, and/or seek mental and emotional support.

Speaking about your experience is no easy task. It takes an incredible amount of vulnerability and courage, and we recognize that this doesn’t mean that you couldn’t still use additional support. Continue to navigate through this page to explore additional options for support at the university and within your local community.

Do you wish to utilize resources here at ASU?

ASU Counseling Services, ASU Health Services, and ASU Victim Advocates are confidential resources. The Office of Employee Assistance is a confidential resource for faculty and staff. The Office of Student Advocacy and Assistance (SAA) is a helpful first step in learning more about the resources available to all students. While not confidential, SAA is a private resource. Reporting options can be found at sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/report

That’s okay. The National Sexual Assault Hotline provides crisis support to victims and survivors and can be a helpful first step. Visit the Resources section for more local and national resources outside of ASU.

Continuing to learn about the resources on this page may help you decide if you would like to connect to resources at the university, nationally or locally. Even if you do not wish to speak with someone affiliated with ASU, talking with a community resource or a trusted friend or family member may be helpful in deciding the next steps you wish to take.

Do you wish to utilize community resources?

The National Sexual Assault Hotline provides crisis support to victims and survivors and can be a helpful first step. Visit the Resources section for more local and national resources outside of ASU.

ASU Counseling Services, ASU Health Services, and ASU Victim Advocates are confidential resources. The Office of Employee Assistance is a confidential resource for faculty and staff. The Office of Student Advocacy and Assistance (SAA) is a helpful first step in learning more about the resources available to all students. While not confidential, SAA is a private resource. Reporting options can be found at sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/report

If you do not wish to connect with community resources or ASU resources, you may also decide to connect with national hotlines. Please note that some national hotlines partner with local community agencies to be the service provider for a specific zip code.

Continuing to learn about the resources on this page may help you decide if you would like to connect to resources at the university, nationally or locally. Even if you do not wish to speak with someone affiliated with ASU, talking with a community resource or a trusted friend or family member may be helpful in deciding the next steps you wish to take.

Do you want to talk to a trained ASU student about your experience?

The Sun Devil Support Network is a community of students who are trained to connect their peers with resources at ASU and in the community. Student “advisors” in the Sun Devil Support Network can talk about reporting, medical, and support options, as well as connect you to other resources in the university that can help you with other needs you might have. Student advisors are not confidential.

That’s okay. Some students feel more comfortable speaking with a professional and others prefer to talk to a peer. Some choose not to tell anyone at all. You decide.

If you are unsure whether or not you want to speak to a student in the Sun Devil Support Network, you can visit eoss.asu.edu/sdsn to learn more about the program. You can always decide later to seek support from a peer.

Do you wish to report the incident in some way?

The following reporting options are available to ASU students, faculty and staff, who are victims and survivors. We understand someone’s identity and individual circumstances may determine if and how a victim or survivor chooses to make a report. A victim can choose to pursue one or more of these reporting options. You can choose to report to just the police, just the university, or both. You can also choose to report to neither and speak to a victim advocate. It’s your choice.

Police Department

Filing a police report does not obligate you to press charges. You may file a police report to document your experience without pressing charges.

In an emergency situation or to make a report to the police, dial 9-1-1. The local police department will send an officer to take your report. Make sure to say where the incident took place; on or off campus, and in which city. You can also call the city's police department. If the incident occurred on campus, an ASU Police Department officer will be sent to take your report. You have the right to have a support person or advocate with you during the conversation.

Sometimes victims/survivors do not report incidents immediately due to a variety of reasons. While reporting closest to the incident will provide the highest likelihood that evidence can be collected, you should report if and when you feel most comfortable to do so.

Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (Students)

Incidents that include only students can be reported to ASU Student Rights and Responsibilities. Investigations include interviews, collection of relevant evidence, and both parties are notified of the investigation results. Student Advocacy and Assistance will provide additional support services during the investigation. Reporting to ASU Student Rights and Responsibilities can be done in addition to reporting to the police for criminal prosecution.

Office of University Rights and Responsibilities (Staff and Faculty)

Any incidents that include faculty or staff can be reported to the Office of University Rights and Responsibilities (URR). Reporting to URR can be done in addition to reporting to the police for criminal prosecution. File an incident report with the Office of University Rights and Responsibilities at 480-965-5057 or urr@asu.edu.

Title IX Coordinator

If you are unsure about what to do in a situation where sexual misconduct may have occurred, you can contact the Title IX Coordinator. You can also file a formal complaint of Title IX sexual harassment with the Title IX Coordinator. View the ASU Title IX Statement for more information on policies and procedures related to Title IX.

ASU Hotline

Reports received through the hotline will be sent to the appropriate office for investigation and follow-up. Complaints that involve students will be sent to the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities. Complaints that involve faculty or staff members will be sent to the Office of University Rights and Responsibilities. Please note: anonymous reporting will limit the ability to investigate. For more information, visit audit.asu.edu/asu-hotline or call 1-877-SUN-DEVL (786-3385).

Deciding whether or not to report is a personal decision. Even if you do not want to report an incident, it does not mean you cannot seek other resources. It is important to recognize that victims and survivors choose not to report for a variety of reasons, including barriers they can face as a member of a marginalized group. For example, read more about the barriers to reporting for black survivors, indigenious survivors, LGBTQ survivors, and male-identified survivors, and respect someone’s decision to not report. In the same way we do not want to pressure someone to report, we should also not talk someone out of reporting if they decide that is the best choice for them.

Even if a victim or survivor decides not to report immediately following the incident, they can always do so in the future. In both criminal justice investigations by the police and administrative investigations by the university, it is helpful to report closer to the time the incident occurred as it is more likely that evidence will be preserved and that any witnesses involved will have a clearer picture of what happened. If someone would like to have a forensic examination done, it must be completed within 120 hours (5 days of the assault).

Has your experience been reported on your behalf due to ASU’s mandatory reporting policy? (Students)

In order to ensure all members of our community have access to health and safety resources, should an incident occur all ASU employees are mandatory reporters and must report allegations of sexual assault/harassment.

We know for some it may be upsetting to learn of ASU’s mandatory reporting policy and that one’s experience needs to be reported. For others, they may find the process supportive and have a desire to be connected to resources.

Either way, it may be helpful to know that these reports are made so that students can be connected to resources for additional support and that the level at which a student engages with these resources and the next steps that are taken are up to the student. If a faculty, staff member, or student employee is notified that someone in our community has experienced harassment, discrimination, or violence, they or their supervisor will notify the Dean of Student’s Office. Student Advocacy and Assistance (SAA) will reach out to the person who had the experience, and will invite them to meet to talk through resources, including reporting and support options. While SAA will report the information to Student Rights & Responsibilities, who will reach out regarding an investigation, the student decides how they wish to participate in the process.

It is also important to know that the employee who reported the experience will not receive any further information about the student as their information is kept private. If the person who reported your experience checks back in with you, it is entirely up to you as to what you share with that person. You are not obligated to provide any information about your experience or what resources you choose to access.

As a reminder, if you disclose your situation to any faculty, staff, or student employees outside of ASU Health Services, ASU Counseling Services, and the ASU Police Victim Advocate, the person receiving your disclosure will need to report it. Learn more about private and confidential resources at the top of this webpage.

You might be unsure whether or not someone reported an experience on your behalf. ASU’s policy is to report any disclosures made by students to the Dean of Students Office, the Title IX Coordinator, or the Office of University Rights and Responsibilities. Once someone reports your experience to the university, you should receive an email from the Office of Advocacy and Assistance inviting you to meet and talk through resources. If you made a disclosure to a faculty/staff member and someone from the university has not contacted you, you can reach out to SAA directly or can contact the Title IX coordinator to let them know about this experience.

Do you feel safe in your current residence?

That’s good to hear--sometimes these experiences of violence can cause us to feel unsafe in our homes or residences. Should this change in the future, there are resources and support available.

Your safety is important. If you feel you are in immediate danger, consider reaching out to emergency services or 911. It also may be helpful to connect with a confidential support person who can discuss reporting options, safety planning and available resources with you. Visit our confidential resources webpage to learn more.

These situations can be complex and it is normal to feel unsure. Speaking with a victim advocate can help in navigating options and answering any questions you may have. Consider downloading the myPlan app, a private resource that will walk you through how to evaluate your current relationship to better understand your level of safety and where there may be some concerns. The app will also connect you with local resources that may be able to provide further support and assistance.

Do you wish to seek medical care?

ASU Health Services is dedicated to the well-being and educational success of each student, and offers more than 20 board-certified physicians and nurse practitioners. It is important that victims of sexual and relationship violence seek medical care to have their injuries treated and checked for sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy. ASU Health Services does not provide forensic exams, these can only be provided through the Family Advocacy Centers in the Phoenix area. (See more information below about Forensic Medical Exams)

If you decide you do not want to seek medical care, you can always do so at a later time for ongoing health concerns. However, please keep in mind that if you do wish to have a forensic medical exam done to collect evidence following the assault, it must be done within 120 hours (5 days) and can be completed at a Family Advocacy Center.

If you are still unsure about what to do, you are not alone. Experiencing sexual violence is a traumatic event that can have an impact on your physical, mental and emotional well-being. If you are unsure about what to do, you can reach out to ASU Student Advocacy and Assistance or the Title IX Coordinator. Remember, these resources are private, but not confidential. For confidential resources, visit sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/confidential-support.

Are you considering having a forensic examination?

A forensic exam, sometimes called a SANE Exam or a Rape Kit, collects evidence following an experience of sexual assault. The Honor Health Forensic Nurse Examiner Program collaborates with cities across Maricopa County to ensure exams are conducted in trauma-informed spaces within Family Advocacy Centers. The Honor Health Forensic Nurse Examiner Program holds a contract with Maricopa County to provide all forensic exams. Exams are not conducted in hospital settings, except in the case of emergencies and health concerns that require immediate attention. Forensic exams are free of charge.

Review the Arizona Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Factsheet, developed by the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence, to learn more about forensic exams.

If you report sexual assault to a police department, they will ask you if you would like to have a forensic exam if the assault happened within the last 120 hours (5 days). If you decide to have a forensic exam, they will work with the forensic nurse to have the exam done in a Family Advocacy Center. Depending on where the sexual assault took place, Victim Advocates from the local city will attend with you to explain your options. Regardless of where the assault took place, ASU Police Department Victim Advocates can provide support.

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Reauthorization also states that any victim can receive a forensic exam, regardless of whether or not they choose to report to a police department. These exams, referred to as “VAWA exams,” also need to be conducted within 5 days of the experience. A VAWA exam can be scheduled by calling 480-312-6339.

That’s okay, there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to seeking a forensic examination and it is understandable that one might choose not to pursue this.

If you are unsure if you want to have a medical forensic exam done following an assault, you can learn more about what the exam entails here. While you do not have to have an exam done immediately following an assault, medical forensic exams in Maricopa County must be done within five days of the incident. All states and even some counties vary when it comes to the timeframe in which a victim/survivor has to have an exam done. If you want to talk with someone confidentially about whether an exam is the right choice for you, you can speak with an ASU PD Victim Advocate or community based advocates confidentially.

Do you wish to seek mental health support?

If you wish to utilize ASU resources, ASU Counseling Services is a confidential resource that can support your mental and emotional well-being. ASU Counseling Services can talk with you about your experience, make a referral for outside support, and/or provide information about support groups. ASU Counseling Services staff are reflective of the diversity of the ASU student community, and has counselors of different identities and backgrounds. Victims and survivors of sexual violence will not be charged for their counseling appointment if they state the reason they are seeking support is due to sexual violence.

Should you wish to seek support after hours, contact ASU’s dedicated mental health line through EMPACT: 480-921-1006.

There are a variety of mental health resources available to ASU students through community resources.

That’s alright, how you wish to seek support is your choice. If you decide not to seek mental health counseling, you can always do so at any point in time. You may wish to reach out to a trusted friend or family member. While not a mental health professional, talking to a trusted person in one’s life can provide additional daily support and assistance when it comes to navigating next steps.

It is normal to feel unsure about whether or not you want to seek mental health counseling. While there is still a stigma in our society surrounding therapy, it is important to know that it is okay to ask for help. If a one on one meeting with a psychologist, social worker, or therapist does not seem right for you, there are a variety of options for group support within the community.

Do you need assistance with academics?

The Office of Advocacy and Assistance can work with you to support your academics by contacting your professors, assisting with a medical or compassionate withdrawal, or helping to change your classes if you have concerns about safety. If you do not wish to tell someone about your experience but want academic support, you can find out more information about Academic Success Programs and Tutoring. As a reminder, all staff members are mandatory reporters, and if you share your experience with someone, including a student tutor, the staff member you talk to will need to report.

That is okay. Some victims or survivors will not be affected academically and others will. Regardless, it is important to take care of your mental and physical well-being and not pressure yourself to excel academically.

You may not know whether or not you want assistance with your academics. If you would like someone to talk to confidentially to help make the right choice for you, talk with ASU Counseling or ASU PD Victim Services.

Are you in need of financial support?

Sexual and domestic violence can have a profound economic impact on victims and survivors. In Arizona, all counties have a Victim Compensation Program for victims of crime. To be eligible for victim’s compensation programs, the victim or survivor will need to report the crime. Learn more about reporting here.

The Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence (ACESDV) offers a Survivor Emergency Relief Fund with fewer barriers than victim’s compensation programs.

If ASU students present a financial need due to an experience of sexual violence, they should contact the Dean of Students Office for additional resources.

That’s okay. Not all experiences of sexual violence result in financial need.

It can be difficult to fully know what your needs are following an experience of violence. This article may help you decide whether or not financial assistance is helpful. Keep in mind that victim compensation programs typically require an application soon after the crime occured.

Resource contact information

For Emergencies call 9-1-1

ASU Police Department
480-965-3456
Help is available 24/7

ASU Counseling Services (students)
Confidential
480-965-6146

ASU Health Services
Confidential
480-965-3349

Employee Assistance Office
(Employees)
Confidential
480-965-2271

Crisis Support is available 24/7 by contacting

EMPACT Hotline (students)
Confidential
480-921-1006

Behavioral Health Crisis Line (employees)
Confidential
602-222-9444

RAINN Sexual Assault Hotline (National)
Confidential
1-800-656-HOPE(4673)

National Domestic Violence Hotline
Confidential
1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Confidential
1-800-273-8255

Family Advocacy Centers (FAC) Medical Forensic Exams
In Maricopa County, HonorHealth Forensic Nurse Examiner Program conducts medical forensic exams at Family Advocacy Centers (FACs) located in Mesa, Scottsdale, Glendale, and Downtown Phoenix, near ASU’s campuses. When reporting to law enforcement, the exam will be scheduled on your behalf and you will be transported to the FAC. If you do not wish to report to law enforcement and live in Maricopa county, you can call HonorHealth at 480-312-6339 (available 24/7) and enter a call back number. A nurse will call you back soon after. If you reside in Arizona but do not live in Maricopa County, review this list of medical forensic exam facilities in Arizona.

Family Advocacy Center Information is listed below. Please note that these centers typically operate from 8am-5pm and should be contacted prior to visiting. All FACs have a law enforcement presence. While the FAC staff may provide you with additional resources or connect you to law enforcement for reporting, the best way to have a medical forensic exam done is to follow the information listed above.

Mesa Center Against Family Violence
225 E. 1st St, Mesa, AZ 8520
480-644-4075

Phoenix Family Advocacy Center
2120 N Central Ave #250, Phoenix, AZ
85004-1453
602-534-2120

Scottsdale Family Advocacy Center
10225 E. Via Linda, Scottsdale, AZ 85258
480-312-6340

Glendale Family Advocacy Center
4600 W. Glendale, Glendale, AZ 85301
623-930-3720